Flickr on the Desktop

Mac users looking for a Flickr desktop manager will find Flickery [Mac - $14.99] quite impressive.

Flickery desktop

Flickery desktop

In this example, you are looking at my photo collection in Flickr. The panel on the left allows me to wander through my albums, galleries and groups. The center panel displays the content of the selected item – in this case a photoset. Using the panel on the right, I can add/update the metadata for the selected image(s). I can also download selected files and even search Flickr – all inside of Flickery. There is an uploader in Flickery, but uploads are not performed in the background although the developer promises that version 2.0 will. I’m quite happy with iPhoto’s Share to Flickr function and since my photo processing workflow begins with iPhoto to review and edit, I’m not going to change that.

I’ve been a Flickr user for almost 9 years and have more than 7,000 photos posted there so as you can imagine, my collection needs some serious housekeeping. Flickr’s Organizer tool is quite functional, but it’s slow and clunky. Flickery has already paid for itself by making it drag-and-drop easy to move photos from one set to another. My cleanup is going much easier.

And I haven’t even looked at Flickery’s social features yet . . .

Byword Adds Image Upload Capability

Byword icon

Click for details.

Byword (both desktop and mobile versions) can now upload local images to WordPress using the Publish feature. Version 2.2, which was released a few days ago, offers this new feature along with several minor bug fixes. The mobile version also lets you insert images from Clipboard, your Photos Library, iCloud and Dropbox using Markdown image references.

Byword’s Publish feature is an in-app purchase ($4.99 for iOS and $4.99 for Mac).

Byword publish panel

Byword publish panel

 

Save Your Photos Day

Save Your Photos Day Logo

Moultrie Creek is proud to be a member of the Save Your Photos Alliance – a group of organizations, governmental agencies, associations and businesses dedicated to preserving and protecting our precious photos from disaster and helping to recover and restore damaged photos should a disaster happen.

One September 27th, the alliance is kicking off their first Save Your Photos Day with a number of events across the U.S. and Canada. There’s even one event scheduled in New Zealand! Visit the Events page to see if there’s one near you. Even if there isn’t an event nearby, there are plenty of things you can do:

  1. Create a free account at Flickr, the amazing online photo-sharing platform.
  2. Check your photo-editing program to see if it includes the ability to upload photos to Flickr. I know iPhoto does.
  3. Start uploading your photos – using your app or Flickr’s uploader.

Flickr offers a ton of features for organizing, displaying and sharing your photos, but more than anything else it provides a safe, off-site location to store copies of those precious images. Flickr provides every user with 1 TB of photo storage at no cost. That’s equivalent to 560,000 high-resolution photographs. Should your hard drive crash or a disaster destroy your home, you can replace equipment and rebuild your house, but you cannot replace those photos unless you’ve taken steps to store copies in a safe location.

I’ll be talking more about Save Your Photos Day and Flickr throughout the month. In the meantime, if you’d like to learn more about Flickr, you can begin here. You’ll also find other related articles spotlighted below.

Dropbox Pro: Same Price – 10 Times More Storage

Dropbox announced yesterday that its Pro account ($9.99/mo, $99/year) has now been increased to 1TB of storage (that’s 1,000 GB) along with improved sharing controls and the ability to remotely delete your Dropbox files from your mobile device should it be lost or stolen.

Combine this with the 1TB of photo storage you get with a free Flickr account and you have some serious off-site storage capabilities.

Why did this happen? My guess is it’s related Apple’s upcoming release of iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite (Have you noticed all the apps being updated lately?) which includes a new iCloud Drive. I understand it also includes much lower prices for storage. This is another example of how competition is good for the consumer.