Protect Your Work with Ulysses Backup

Protect Your Work with Ulysses Backup

Ulysses for Mac and iPad include an automatic backup feature that is turned on by default. On the Mac, your data is automatically backed up hourly (keeping the last 12 hours), daily (keeping the last 7 days) and weekly (keeping the last 6 months). Backed up files are stored on your computer. iPad backups are less frequent because of the devices space restrictions. Ulysses backup preferences on…

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Protect Your Work with Ulysses Backup

Ulysses for Mac and iPad include an automatic backup feature that is turned on by default. On the Mac, your data is automatically backed up hourly (keeping the last 12 hours), daily (keeping the last 7 days) and weekly (keeping the last 6 months). Backed up files are stored on your computer. iPad backups are less frequent because of the devices space restrictions.

Ulysses Backup Preferences on Mac
Ulysses backup preferences on Mac

You can browse your backup files using the Browse Backups button in the Preferences panel or File > Browse Backups… To restore specific content, use the Browse window to drag and drop the needed content into your current library.

It is also possible to “lock” a backup so it won’t be automatically erased when it hits the standard backup schedule.

Currently there is no plan to offer a cloud backup option.

Why You Need a Blog Editor

Why You Need a Blog Editor

Those of us with a treasured family journal, scrapbook or collection of letters have a window into the personal side of our family’s history. That one or more generations of people took the time and effort to protect and preserve those treasures makes them even more precious. Today, we have a large community of bloggers documenting and sharing their research and family stories. It’s amazing how…

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Why You Need a Blog Editor

Those of us with a treasured family journal, scrapbook or collection of letters have a window into the personal side of our family’s history. That one or more generations of people took the time and effort to protect and preserve those treasures makes them even more precious. Today, we have a large community of bloggers documenting and sharing their research and family stories. It’s amazing how quickly these “little stories” become impressive historical collections.

That’s the good news.

What happens to all that work when the blog platform you are using shuts down or has a server crash? There are all kinds of disasters that can impact your blog and its content. What are you doing to protect your work?

While most blog platforms include an online editor to make it easy to write and publish your posts, you may want to consider using a desktop (or mobile) editing app instead. There are a number of advantages to using an editor. Besides the obvious backup advantage, an editor will also make it easier to repurpose your posts into other family history publications.

BywordScreen001
Byword for Mac

I found two wonderful apps (for Mac and iOS) that support both my blogging effort and my writing projects while protecting both. I use Byword (Mac – $11.99, iOS – $5.99) as my blog editor. Its publishing feature (requires a $3.99 in-app purchase) supports posting to WordPress, Medium, Tumblr, Blogger and Evernote. With Byword, each post is saved to iCloud and published to WordPress. I also use the Ulysses writing platform (Mac – $44.99 and iPad – $19.99) to manage my writing projects. Ulysses supports an “external folder” option that allows me to connect to those Byword folders holding my blog posts. Copies of any post is easily dragged into a writing project.

Even better … both Byword and Ulysses support Markdown, as does WordPress, so not only am I protecting my posts from disaster, I’m future-proofing my stories – saving them from the scrapyard of obsolete software.

Google Removes Dennis Cooper’s 14-Year-Old Blog

Cooper’s situation highlights the dangers of entrusting your content to a publishing service that may not even give fair notice before removing your website. As a writer and performer whose livelihood depends on the freedom of expression, Cooper would be better served with an open source, self-hosted publishing platform like WordPress, along with daily off-site backups for peace of mind.

Get the whole story at WordPress Tavern.