A Picture Map of London History

A Picture Map of London History

If you have ancestors who lived in London, you will find Collage, The London Picture Archive, a gorgeous look into your family history. It took two years to digitize more than 250,000 images and maps. The result is a gorgeous site that will amaze and delight. There’s an impressive search component, but the best way to begin is to scroll down the site’s home page to the featured galleries and…

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A Picture Map of London History

If you have ancestors who lived in London, you will find Collage, The London Picture Archive, a gorgeous look into your family history.

Collage site banner

It took two years to digitize more than 250,000 images and maps. The result is a gorgeous site that will amaze and delight. There’s an impressive search component, but the best way to begin is to scroll down the site’s home page to the featured galleries and further down to the subject browsing area. After spending some time wandering through the many collections available, you’ll have a better idea how to search for specific locations or historical periods.

Be warned! It’s going to be hard to stay focused. There’s so much to see that it is too easy to get distracted.

Walters Art Museum Goes With Creative Commons

The Walters Art Museum has gone Creative Commons Zero. “By releasing their metadata and images under a CC0 license, the Walters has made an unprecedented move in the United States GLAM world. The Walters is a museum that celebrates its collection as being a part of the public trust – a collection that is made as accessible as possible to the public. Their collection was donated to the City of Baltimore and is practically ‘owned’ by the people.”

via ResearchBUZZ

Walters Art Museum Goes With Creative Commons

Olive Tree Genealogy Blog: British Library Puts 1,000,000 images into Public Domain

We have released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose. These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books digitised by Microsoft who then generously gifted the scanned images to us, allowing us to release them back into the Public Domain.

The images themselves cover a startling mix of subjects: There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more that even we are not aware of.

You can access these public domain images at the British Library’s Flickr Acoount

Olive Tree Genealogy Blog: British Library Puts 1,000,000 images into Public Domain