WordPress Shortcodes – Recipes

WordPress Shortcodes – Recipes

Are you familiar with WordPress Shortcodes? These are handy little codes that simplify adding all kinds of formatted elements to your blog posts. For example, shortcodes make it easy to build a presentation right in your post. No PowerPoint or Keynote needed. Shortcodes simplify embedding videos, make it easy to create a sitemap of your site and many more things you’ll find useful. Some basic…

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WordPress Shortcodes – Recipes

Are you familiar with WordPress Shortcodes? These are handy little codes that simplify adding all kinds of formatted elements to your blog posts. For example, shortcodes make it easy to build a presentation right in your post. No PowerPoint or Keynote needed. Shortcodes simplify embedding videos, make it easy to create a sitemap of your site and many more things you’ll find useful. Some basic shortcodes are available to both WordPress.com authors and self-hosted WordPress authors. There are a number of shortcodes that are only available to WordPress.com authors. This recipe shortcode is one of them. Self-hosted sites have a broad range of shortcode plugins available to them as well as any number of recipe plugins.

If you want to post family recipes to your WordPress.com family history blog, it’s really quite simple. Here’s what a recipe looks like in the editor.

recipe shortcodes example
A view of the recipe in the editor screen.

Here’s what that recipe looks like online. Note that your site’s theme will impact the actual look for your recipe.

formatted recipe
The formatted recipe as it appears on the website.

I kept this recipe simple, but the  shortcode supports a number of additional features like notes, number of servings, difficulty and even makes it easy to include a photo of the dish. You’ll find complete details on how to use the recipe shortcode at WordPress.com Support.

WordPress Shortcodes

A shortcode is a WordPress.com feature that makes it easy to pull content from your blog as well as outside sources into a page or post. For example, you can copy/paste the embed code to display a YouTube video or you could pull it into a post with a simple shortcode like the one you see below. Want to display some of your older posts at the bottom of an…

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WordPress Shortcodes

A shortcode is a WordPress.com feature that makes it easy to pull content from your blog as well as outside sources into a page or post. For example, you can copy/paste the embed code to display a YouTube video or you could pull it into a post with a simple shortcode like the one you see below.

[youtube https://youtu.be/L1_W0LCHwK4]

Want to display some of your older posts at the bottom of an existing one? You can use shortcodes to display content from a specific category, author or tag. This example shows a list Gazette posts from the Blog Bytes category.

[display-posts category="Blog Bytes" posts_per_page="5"]

How about including a Google Map in a post, an online calendar, photos from Instagram or a slideshow from Slideshow? You can do this and much more. There’s even a shortcode to make formatting a recipe much easier.

You’ll find details on all the common WordPress shortcodes at WordPress.com’s Shortcode Support page. For self-hosted WordPress users, you will also discover that a number of plugins include their own shortcodes. Visit the developer’s support page for information on using them. Spend some time browsing shortcodes and see if they don’t make customizing your blog a lot easier.

WordPress 101: Shortcodes

Shortcodes are a WordPress user’s best friend. They are simple codes used to perform more complex functions. The most frequent use of shortcodes is to embed media from a number of sources. If you’ve ever copy/pasted an embed code from YouTube, you’ll understand. Instead of 20 lines of code making absolutely no sense, you have a simple one line shortcode with a few simple options.

Both WordPress.com and self-hosted WordPress users can enjoy the simplicity of shortcodes. WordPress.com users have a number of shortcodes built into the platform. Self-hosted bloggers can include these shortcodes on your site by installing the Jetpack plugin. In addition, there are a growing number of shortcode plugins available via WordPress.org and many of the newer themes include shortcodes in their themes. One very good example is the Elegant Themes collection. [Disclaimer: Both my Moultrie Creek Books and Moultrie Journal sites are using themes from Elegant Themes.]

Shortcodes make embedding video (from YouTube, Vimeo, Flickr, Blip, Daily Motion and more), audio (from sound cloud, rdio, spotify and more), documents (from Scribd, Slideshare, Google Docs, MS Office Live and more) along with forms, polls and other goodies. For a complete list of the standard shortcodes available at WordPress.com and through Jetpack, visit the Shortcode support page.

Some media platforms – like Scribd shown below – will build your shortcode for you as one of their embed options. Most state that this is for WordPress.com sites only, but if you have Jetpack installed on your self-hosted site, it will work just fine for you too. Notice that the shortcode includes options like the display mode.

Here’s what the shortcode looks like once you’ve pasted it into a post.

You will only see the shortcode in your post editor. You won’t see the embedded media – from whatever platform – until you save and preview the post.

Although this is just a short introduction to shortcodes, future posts will look at specific shortcodes in detail to demonstrate how you can put them to use in your WordPress blog. While the media shortcodes will make your blogging a whole lot easier, they are just the beginning. There’s lots more blogging goodness to be found in shortcodes.