Society Evernote

We are all aware of Evernote‘s fabulous note-taking capabilities, but what about its collaborative features? One very useful way those collaborative tools can be put to good use is the management of society publishing projects. It’s tough enough to keep all the contributors updated and maintain deadlines when everyone’s nearby, but it’s even more difficult when contributors are spread around the…

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Manage Society Articles with Scrivener

Manage Society Articles with Scrivener

How does your society maintain the many articles published in your quarterly journals and newsletters? Over the years those publications become quite an archive of genealogical goodness. That’s the good news. The bad news is that in many cases your archive is mostly paper copies. Even if you’ve saved the master copies created on desktop computers, chances are good that the software used to create…

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Manage Society Articles with Scrivener

Society Corner badgeHow does your society maintain the many articles published in your quarterly journals and newsletters? Over the years those publications become quite an archive of genealogical goodness. That’s the good news. The bad news is that in many cases your archive is mostly paper copies. Even if you’ve saved the master copies created on desktop computers, chances are good that the software used to create them doesn’t exist anymore and you can no longer read those old files.

Why is this a problem? The articles and transcribed records published in those old issues could be a goldmine of revenue for your society if you can digitize and organize them. Once that is done, it is then possible to make them available for sale. Fortunately, many of today’s scanners are able to create digital files of “editable text”. Instead of just having a photocopy of each page, you can actually copy/paste the text from the scanned file. You don’t have to have a high-end scanner either. Many of your members have impressive scanner apps on their phones. They may not be the best choice for an archival quality copy of the original document but they will give you editable text with a minimal amount of effort. Look for a scanner – desktop or mobile – offering OCR (optical character recognition) support.

Scanning will make it possible to digitize your paper masters, but now you need a safe place to organize and keep them for future use. That’s where Scrivener comes in. Scrivener is not a word-processing program, but rather a writing platform. What’s the difference? It’s designed to organize manuscripts into scenes rather than documents. The writer can then arrange and rearrange those scenes as needed. For the family historian, it means you can write the stories as your research gives them to you and then arrange them into timelines, family groups or whatever. For the publications chair, it makes collecting, organizing and managing articles a lot easier. And it supports Markdown [see An Introduction to Markdown] which will insure those articles won’t get left behind as technology moves forward.

Scrivener ($45.00) is available for both Windows and Mac desktops. In the example below you are looking at a society newsletter project in Scrivener for Mac. The selected article appears in the editor panel while the sidebar provides access to individual articles organized into folders by issue. The Front Matter section holds repetitive content such as publishing guidelines and copyright notices. There are also areas for managing graphics, notes and even research (making it so useful to family historians).

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Scrivener can import files created in Word, Pages and other formats, so it’s easy to pull member-submitted articles into your project. It also supports including photos and graphics. It offers features like automatic backups to protect your work and snapshots so you can quickly return to a previous version of an edited article.

The compile feature makes it possible to export the entire publication or just selected articles. Your publication can be exported to rich text (RTF) or Word (DOCX) format for printing or further formatting. You can compile to HTML, ePub and Kindle format using custom stylesheets. Scrivener includes a number of compile formats so you can choose how your compiled document will look. You can also create your own custom formats. These would be quite useful if your publish in a “journal” format, however an outside app like InDesign would still be needed for more complex magazine-style layouts.

If you are using Markdown within the Scrivener editor, you can compile and export an “archival” copy of each issue or project in plain text format. If you do not use Markdown, export your archival copy to HTML. It is also plain text only it has a lot more “formatting code” elements than Markdown.

Since Scrivener is unlike most word-processing apps, it will take some time to get comfortable using it. Fortunately it is so popular with writers – and now family historians – that there’s a lot of support out there. Lynn Palermo’s Scrivener for the Family Historian [PDF – $9.99 or Print via Amazon – $14.99] is a good place to start.

Next up . . . what to do with that collection of genealogical goodness once it’s all digitized and organized.

Scribd your society’s bottom line

Are costs driving your society’s publishing efforts? Would you like to move to color, but you just can’t afford it? Does postage eat up most of your publishing budget?

What would you say if I told you that you could produce and distribute a high-quality newslettter or journal – including full color photos and graphics – on a dime? Would you be interested?

You can! And, not only can you do that, but you can also generate revenue by offering your publications for sale with a world-wide reach.

The boom in electronic publishing continues to grow with all kinds of devices making it possible to read whenever and wherever you want. If you create and distribute your society publications as electronic documents, you can add color, hyperlinks and even video.

What’s the catch? Yes, there is one. You will need to change how you create your publications and we all know that old habits are hard to break. There will be staff and members who want to continue the old ways. There might even still be a few members who don’t own a computer or have access to email, but those numbers continue to fall. If members demand a print version of the publication, give it to them – at a price.

Scribd Profile Page
Scribd Profile Page

The Scribd publishing platform offers an online library for any of your society publications. You can upload your documents to either public or private areas under your organization’s name and logo. This allows you to distribute newsletters and journals as electronic documents via your Scribd site, saving both printing and mailing costs. Scribd even offers a storefront where you can sell back issues and other publications to a world-wide audience.

Scribd costs nothing to publish. You can post documents created in Word, Excel, PowerPoint and PDF formats. Original documents can be scanned to PDF format and uploaded. All uploaded files are converted to Scribd’s HTML5 format which supports any number of presentation options – including the free Scribd apps for just about every tablet and smart phone there is.

Scribd on the iPad
Reading a Scribd publication on the iPad

Not only does this give your organization a facility to share your publications with members, it also provides a safe data archive should anything happen to the originals.

What can you sell via Scribd? In addition to your recurring publications, you can make any number of other documents available. Things like cemetery indexes, biographical sketches or regimental histories are good for starters, along with research guides and other how-to publications. The past issues of your quarterly journals are a gold mine to people researching in your society’s area. Those recent issues still residing on your computers can be uploaded and available in your Scribd store within minutes. Older issues only available in print format will need to be scanned before they can be included.

Selling publications through Scribd is amazingly easy. You upload the publication to the Scribd Store, set a price and let everyone know where to find it. Scribd handles all the purchase and payment tasks and provides the customer service. It costs you nothing upfront, but Scribd will deduct a 20% commission off each sale, then send you your earnings every month. As part of each upload you can use Scribd’s preview function to identify specific pages as part of the document’s preview. Setting the preview to include the publication’s table of contents makes it easy for prospective readers to see if this issue has articles associated with their research interests.

Scribd collection
Scribd Collection

Scribd users can take advantage of the collections feature to organize documents within a specific library. You can also include documents from other libraries within your collections. By encouraging members to publish their content at Scribd and using the collections feature to spotlight their effort on the society’s profile page, you not only give them additional visibility for their work but your society’s library becomes a hub for local information.

Recently, Scribd introduced a premium reader program. Readers can subscribe to the program for a day, a month or a year and gain access to publications made available within the program. Think of it as similar to Netflix, only for publications. Including publications in the program generates revenue too – a commission for each premium reader who reads or downloads one of your premium documents.

In addition to maintaining your society page at Scribd, you can also embed documents on your society’s web site – like the one you see below. Post the latest newsletter or quarterly journal to announce its availability. Create a spotlight page to identify the latest additions to the collection. Spotlight a member’s latest publishing effort. These are simple, but effective marketing techniques that will generate member traffic to your Scribd store. And, because documents posted at Scribd are very search-friendly, it’s quite likely your collection will attract distant researchers too.

Scribd is one of a number of affordable publishing resources now available for both individuals and societies. It’s working hard to become the one you choose first.

Society Evernote

We are all aware of Evernote‘s fabulous note-taking capabilities, but what about its collaborative features? One very useful way those collaborative tools can be put to good use is the management of society publishing projects. It’s tough enough to keep all the contributors updated and maintain deadlines when everyone’s nearby, but it’s even more difficult when contributors are spread around the world. Evernote can make life a whole lot easier for editors and contributors of a society or family publication. Let’s take a look. Continue reading “Society Evernote”